How do I help my child with...

Access to Community Resources and Providers
Alcohol, Tobacco, Other Drug Use
Behavior
Bullying and Social Skills
Grief and Children
Health Care Services
Immunization information
Internet Safety
Nutrition and Fitness
Physical Health and Wellness
Sexual Health
Social/Emotional Health—Depression and Anxiety
Talking with Your Kids
Issaquah School District Disclaimer

Access to Community Resources and Providers

Swedish Hospital, the Issaquah Schools Foundation, and the Issaquah Community Network—working with District counseling staff—have developed resources for parents and students to use in seeking help and information.

  • Call for Help    A handy two-sided reference card with phone numbers and service information
    • 24-HOUR Crisis Line 206-761-3222, 866-4CRISIS (866-427-4747)
    • Community Information Line 206-461-3200, 800-621-4636, or 877-211-WASH (9274)
    • TEENLINK 866-TEENLINK, 866-833-6546, 206-461-4922
  • Guide to Providers     When to get help; whom to contact—agency or individual provider; what to ask; booking appointments; paying for services; selecting the right provider; patient's rights
Community Resource links
  • Community Resources Online. The most up-to-date and comprehensive database of non-profit and government health and human services in King County.
    • Extended Features  Overview and help; searching for resources; using keywords search; using topic search; location; results; saved searches; saved plans; user accounts
    • Full Packet All materials in one packet-Call for Help, Guide to Providers, and Extended Features.
  • Crisis Clinic. Information and contacts for those with immediate needs.
  • Friends of Youth. Friends of Youth provides a wide range of services for youth and young adults ages 6-24 and their families.
  • National Safe Place.Youth in need of help can depend on any location with a Safe Place sign. Go to the National Safe Place website to learn more about the program and to find local Safe Places. Safe Place agency staff make sure the young people and their families receive the help and professional referrals they need.
  • Parents and Teens Survival Guide (formerly Parents, Teens, and the Law). A convenient and useful reference tool for parents and their teenagers.
  • TXT 4 HELP is a nationwide service offered by National Safe Place to help teens connect to the closest location where they can get immediate help and safety. How does it work?If you're in a crisis, text the word SAFE and your current location (address/city/state) to 69866. The program texts back the address of the nearest Safe Place site and contact number for the local youth shelter. That same message will include a prompt that says, "reply with 2CHAT for more help." Once you reply, you'll be connected with a professional for more help.
  • Where to Turn For Teens (WTTFT). A resource guide that was created specifically for youth who are seeking personal empowerment with the support of others. The agencies listed in the WTTFT can link youth to organizations that provide a wide variety of services. The goal of WTTFT is to make sure teens are aware of the many youth-friendly resources that exist to serve individual needs.

Alcohol, Tobacco, Other Drug Use

  • Focus Adolescent Services. A clearinghouse of information, resources and support for parents to help teens and heal families.
  • Friends of Youth. Friends of Youth provides a wide range of services for youth and young adults ages 6-24 and their families.
  • Parents and Teens Survival Guide. (formerly Parents, Teens, and the Law). A convenient and useful reference tool for parents and their teenagers.
  • Parents. The Anti-Drug. Information about various drugs; what parents can do to reduce the risk that their children will use drugs; and info on how to talk to your children about drugs. In addition to English, they also offer info in Spanish, Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese!
  • Parenting is Prevention. A site for parents to help them keep their children drug free. Great source for parent articles for school newsletters. Also has an e-mail tip service you can sign up for.
  • Smoking. The Department of Health's website to help you quit smoking including support ideas, resources and a chat line.
  • Substance abuse. National Institute of Health's drug information for kids ages 5-9 addresses the brain's responses to different drugs.
  • WA State Coalition to Reduce Underage Drinking (RUaD). Quick tips on how to talk with young people, what the laws are, how to get involved in the local community, and other resources.

Behavior

  • ADD/ADHD. National Resource Center for ADD with links to local support groups and information about ADD.

Bullying and Social Skills

Grief and Children

  • Grief and Children. Children's Grief Education Association serves the needs of grieving children and families and provides education and support to those who care for them.

Health Care Services

Internet Safety

Nutrition and Fitness

Physical Health and Wellness

Sexual Health

Social/Emotional Health—Depression and Anxiety

  • Community Resources Online. The most up-to-date and comprehensive database of non-profit and government health and human services in King County.
  • Crisis Clinic. Information and contacts for those with immediate needs.
  • Depression and Anxiety. This link accesses the Children’s Hospital Center for Children with Special Needs Childhood and Adolescent Depression and Anxiety Tool Kit. It includes online health information resources focused on anxiety and depression in children and adolescents.
  • Friends of Youth. Friends of Youth provides a wide range of services for youth and young adults ages 6-24 and their families.
  • Parent and Teen Survival Guide (formerly Parents, Teens, and the Law). Resource booklet for parents and teenagers to use in addressing very important and difficult topics including understanding the law in a practical format.
  • Youth Suicide Prevention Program. A private, not-for-profit organization supported by the Department of Health, as well as funding from contributions, corporate gifts, fundraising and training fees. The focus is on public awareness, training and communities in action.
  • Where to Turn For Teens (WTTFT). A resource guide that was created specifically for youth who are seeking personal empowerment with the support of others. The agencies listed in the WTTFT can link youth to organizations that provide a wide variety of services. The goal of WTTFT is to make sure teens are aware of the many youth-friendly resources that exist to serve individual needs.

Talking with Your Kids

  • Kid's Health. Kid's health organization on how to talk with kids about many topics including health and war. Web page is divided into articles for parents, kids, and teens with appropriate topics for each.
  • Book: Staying Connected to Your Teenager; How to keep Them Talking To You and How to Hear What They're Really Saying, by Michael Riera, PH.D.
  • Talking With Kids About Tough Issues. A site to encourage parents to talk with their children earlier and more often about tough issues like ATOD (alcohol, tobacco and other drugs) use and prevention, violence, sex, and HIV/AIDS.
  • How to Talk to your Kids About Anything. These practical tips and techniques can help you talk easily and openly with young children ages 8 to 12 about some very tough topics.
  • Talk With your Child. Establish and maintain good communication with your child.

Issaquah School District Disclaimer

Lists of individual(s)/agencies are provided as informational resources for your convenience. The Issaquah School District does not recommend or endorse any of these individual(s)/agencies provided herein and will not be held liable or responsible for any services provided by them. As such, the Issaquah School District highly recommends that you conduct your own research and investigation and exercise due diligence before selecting any of these individuals/agencies for services.

Report a problem The Issaquah School District provides equal opportunity in its programs, activities, and employment.