i-Ready Domains- Helping your student at home

When students score "Needs Improvement" in a Domain in i-Ready their teacher provides support in class.  Teacher support may include approaches such as the following:

  • Providing small group, explicit instruction in reading or math in class.
  • Working with students to guide their practice and correct their errors.
  • Use tools such as i-Ready My Path and Zearn to give students practice on their specific learning goals.
  • Increase the use of decodable texts or leveled readers so students can practice the skills they are learning with books they can read.
  • In literacy, a student may receive support through our Title / LAP intervention programs.

 

Helping your student at home  

Below are some ways you can support your student at home.

Helping your student in Reading

In general, some of the best ways to help your child become a better reader includes the following:

  • Learn your student's reading level.  The i-Ready family report gives you their reading level as a lexile, and provides a link to finding books near that level.
  • Reading with or to your child.  Reading in any language is good for literacy development.
  • Giving your child a quiet place and a time to read.  Making it a routine helps - some children might do better reading after dinner every night, while other may prefer to read before bed or right after school.
  • Encourage high-interest texts (books they choose).  Close to their reading level is good, but if they are more interested it is okay if it is somewhat lower than their level or a little higher than their level.
  • You can also use i-Ready My-Path for your student to work on reading skills.  Completing 3-4 lessons or 45 minutes per week can help students build skills in their areas of need.  Please let them do the i-Ready lessons as independently as possible.

If your student scored "needs improvement" on an i-Ready topic /domain, here is what you can do to help at home: 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Phonological Awareness

Phonological awareness is about being able to HEAR sounds.  Word play or word games help students develop the ability to hear sounds.

  • Play rhyming games: What rhymes with cat?
  • PBS and other childhood TV shows for early readers that incorporate songs, chants and letters can help students develop phonological awareness.
  • Ask your child what sound a word starts with or ends with (all verbal, no print).  example: What sound does 'dog' start with?  answer: /D/

 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Phonics

  • i-Ready is really supportive of Phonics work, completing i-Ready My Path lessons is a great starting point.
  • Letter and letter sound games can be found online or at game stores.  Letter and word play is good for phonics development.
  • Flyleaf is giving free access to decodable books: https://portal.flyleafpublishing.com/learners-resources/.  Reading these at home can make reading more accessible to students.
  • Help student blend sounds into words.  example: Ask your child to stretch or blend the sounds in the word CAT.  Answer: "/C-AAAA-T/,  CAT"

 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in High Frequency Words

  • Watch the videos provided by Really Great Reading about Heart Word Magic: click here
  • Talk to your teacher about what high frequency words your student should work on.

 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Vocabulary

  • Have student - adult conversations.  Talking over dinner or during a walk with an adult builds vocabulary. 
  • Practice replacing less descriptive words with more descriptive words.  example: the tree is big changes to the tree is enormous.  I went to the store changes to I rushed to the store.  Students could do this verbally or in their writing.
  • Watch the Discovery Channel or National Geographic Channel or similar shows on PBS together and talk about what you are learning.  This can help with comprehension on informational texts as well!
  • Play Apples to Apples Jr., a game you can find through online stores or many stores with games.

 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Comprehension of Literary Texts

  • Read books!  Independent reading of high interest books is important.
  • Ask student to describe the characters, setting and problem/solution in the book they are reading.

 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Comprehension of Informational Texts

  • Check out informational books on any topic of interest - don't worry about the reading level - and read them together.  You don't have to read all the text, you can focus on the most interesting parts.
  • Ask students, What did you learn from this book?
  • Ask students, What is this book or section of the book mostly about?  (don't accept one-word answers; look for things like "snakes are deadly")


Helping your student in Math

In general, some great ways to to support your student become a better mathematician includes the following:

  • Get to know what skills your child is working on, such as adding or multiplying, and what kids of numbers they are working with, such as numbers 1-10 or larger numbers 20-100, or fractions and decimals.
  • Encourage your child to stick with it whenever a problem seems difficult. Rather than give them the answer, help them think through the problem and find a solution with little help.  This will help your child see that everyone can learn math.  
  • Praise your child when he or she makes an effort and share in the excitement when he or she solves a problem or understands something for the first time. 
  • You can also use i-Ready My-Path for your student to work on Math skills.  Completing 3-4 lessons or 45 minutes per week can help students build skills in their areas of need. Please let them do the i-Ready lessons as independently as possible.

If your student scored "needs improvement" on an i-Ready topic /domain, here is what you can do to help at home: 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Numbers and Operations

  • Use everyday objects to allow your child to count and group a collection of objects in different ways. 
  • Encourage your child to build, read and write numbers in multiple ways. 
    • Example: What are ways to build 10?  (3+7, 12-2, 2x5 ...)
    • Example: What are ways to build one half?  cut a whole in half, 1/4+1/4
  • Help your child explain relationships between different numbers. 
    • Example: 147 is 47 more than 100 and 3 less than 150
    • Example: one whole is made up of one-fourth and one-fourth and one-fourth and one-fourth. 
  • Provide opportunities to add, subtract, multiply and divide using numbers seen all around such as in a store or on a street sign or food labels. 
  • Example: This soup costs $2.50, what will 4 cans cost?  

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Algebra and Algebraic Thinking

  • Have your child create math story problems using real situations around the home using the math skills they are learning.
    • Example: I have $7 and need $13 to get the toy I want.  How much more money will I need to save to get the toy?
  • Encourage your child to write equations to represent story problems. 
  • Example: These may include equations such as 7 + __ = 13, rather than expressions that require finding just a sum, difference, product or quotient (such as 13– 7= __). 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Measurement and Data

  • Have your student practice measuring items around the home using non-standard units (such as, “How many pencils long is the TV?”)
  • Have your student practice measuring items around the home using standard units (inch ruler, measuring cup, analog clock). 
  • Provide opportunities to compare measurements using words such as more, less, taller, heavier and faster. 
  • Survey family members and represent data in different ways (tally marks, pictographs, bar graphs, etc.) 

To help a student who scored "needs improvement" in Geometry

  • Look for and compare two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes around the neighborhood or home. (Road signs, household objects, ...) 
  • Draw characters or other objects using specific shapes (example: draw an animal using circles, triangles, rectangles)
  • Identify real world angles that are acute, obtuse, right and straight, and find lines that intersect or are perpendicular or parallel. 
  • Use positional words such as before, after, above, below and beside. (example: The clock is _____ the TV?  answer: above)