Scholarships

  • SCHOLARSHIPS ARE GIFTS! They don't need to be repaid. There are thousands of them, offered by schools, employers, individuals, private companies, nonprofits, communities, religious groups, and professional and social organizations. Students are encouraged to apply for local, state and community scholarships. Scholarships are awarded based on merit, ethnic background, community service, leadership, and personal interests regardless of financial need. Students should be searching and applying for scholarships while they are applying to colleges. Most colleges have scholarship money that they give out on a first come, first serve basis for students who meet specific academic requirements. Check with the colleges you are applying to for specific institutional scholarships. Your cumulative grade point average (GPA) is based on the mathematical average of the designated numeric value of each semester course letter grade for all of your high school credit classes. You can find your cumulative GPA by looking at the cumulative summary at the bottom of your transcript. This number is used in most college applications.

     

  • Scholarship Deadlines: Follow all directions in the application and be careful to meet deadlines. Most scholarships are mailed or emailed directly to the organization who is sponsoring them and can have deadlines any month of the year.

     

  • Scholarship Nominations: A few scholarship organizations ask schools to nominate one student for their scholarship. Students interested in being considered for a scholarship opportunity that require a nomination, need to complete a Scholarship Nomination Form, provide an updated resume and relevant information to principal or designee.

     

  • Scholarship Scams: Please be aware that they are scholarship scams. Ask questions and read information carefully before submitting applications. Echo Glen School does not endorse or recommend specific scholarship programs, but provides these opportunities as a service to students.

     

  • Scholarship Search Engines: Some colleges send scholarships specific to their college only. These are posted when possible, and the best source of college specific scholarship is on the college’s website under financial aid. Once students have made a list of schools they will apply to they should get familiar with each schools financial aid page including FAFSA and CCS profile requirements and scholarship opportunities.

Schoalship search engines

  • RaiseMe Micro:
  • What is RaiseMe? RaiseMe helps students in 9th-12th grades discover colleges and earn scholarships for their academic and extracurricular achievements throughout high school. These scholarships are called “Micro-Scholarships”. When students add achievements to their Portfolio on RaiseMe, they could be eligible to earn Micro-Scholarships towards our partner colleges. These achievements can include good grades, participating in clubs, playing on a sports team, volunteering, or even starting a club. They can include AP or IB courses, honors classes, and college-level courses too.

 

  • How do students use RaiseMe? Students can build a Portfolio of their achievements. Follow Colleges, and watch their scholarship earnings pile up! To see an in-depth demo of how students can earn, their first Micro-Scholarship and share the process with them, check out our Classroom Guide PDF on the Educator page.

 

  • Which colleges can students earn scholarships from on RaiseMe? Over 100 colleges award Micro-Scholarships on RaiseMe, and many more have begun the process of joining. If a student is following a college on RaiseMe that becomes a partner and if the student is eligible for the college’s Micro-Scholarship requirements, the student will automatically become qualified to start earning Micro-Scholarships to that school.

 

  • When and how do students receive their scholarship earnings? When students achieve a goal and earn Micro-Scholarships, they can view their earnings in their personal Portfolio on RaiseMe any time throughout high school. Each college has a different Deadline for students who wish to earn scholarships on RaiseMe. If students decide to apply for admission to a college where they have earned Micro-Scholarships, they must Follow a college before its Follow Deadline and make sure their Portfolio is as complete as possible to ensure their information is fully submitted to the college. If the student is admitted to the college, their scholarship earnings will automatically be included in their financial aid package. RaiseMe will also automatically submit the Portfolios for Seniors in high school to the colleges they are following if their Profiles are complete (they have at least 15 credits) by the colleges’ Deadlines. The scholarships earned on RaiseMe represent a guaranteed minimum amount of scholarship or grant aid that students will receive in their financial aid packages if they are admitted and choose to attend that college. If a student receives an even larger scholarship upon admission, then that scholarship will include or replace the amount that he or she has earned on RaiseMe.

     

  • How many scholarships can students earn from a college on RaiseMe? The amount students can earn is different for each college. It could be $8,000 at one college or $60,000 at another college. The great thing is that students can be eligible to earn from all of the colleges on RaiseMe at the same time if they meet the requirements and choose to follow the colleges.

     

  • Are these real scholarships? The Micro-Scholarships students can earn on RaiseMe vary depending on what each college chooses to offer. Some Micro-Scholarships can range from anywhere between $500 to over $1,000 dollars. For example, if a student gets an A in an English class, he or she could be eligible to receive scholarships from dozens of colleges on RaiseMe.

     

  • How are students’ GPAs calculated on RaiseMe? RaiseMe displays students’ unweighted Grade Point Averages. The GPA on RaiseMe is based on an average of students’ grades in Core Courses, on a scale from 0 to 4.0 (4.0 for an A, 3.0 for a B, etc.). Core Courses include Math, Science, English, Social Studies, and Foreign Language. Note that each college on RaiseMe requires that students meet their minimum GPA to be able to unlock and start earning their Micro-Scholarships. You can see the minimum required GPA for each college by visiting the Colleges page

     

  • Five Easy Steps to Sign Up:
    • STEP 1 Create an account by visiting www.raise.me, click on "I'm a Student" and follow the instructions.
    • STEP 2 Click on the scholarships tab to see what achievements colleges and universities are willing to award.
    • STEP 3 Add your achievements from high school to your portfolio
    • STEP 4 Search for the colleges that you're interested in and follow them.
    • STEP 5 See how much you've earned in micro-scholarships from universities.
  • RaiseMe Resources:
  • Frequently Asked Questions:
  • Who should apply for a scholarship? All students! Any students interested in attending a technical college, community college, or 4-year school should consider applying for free money to help pay for school.

     

  • When should I apply for a scholarship? Most scholarships are offered during senior year, but occasionally students have the opportunity to apply during junior year as well. You should start to become familiar with the process beginning in December of your junior year.

     

  • Who qualifies for a scholarship? Many scholarships are based on financial need and/or academic merit, but not all. Some scholarships are based on community service participation or the ability to have overcome obstacles.

     

  • Where can I find out about local scholarships? Students can look for local/community and state scholarships through https://thewashboard.org

     

  • What is WUE? The Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) is a scholarship that may save you money at a “public” out of state college or university if you qualify. Go to http://wue.wiche.edu to see the list of participating institutions.

     

  • What other items are required besides an app? Many scholarships require you to submit a resume, letters of recommendation, and/or an essay. Applying for scholarships should never require you to pay a fee!

     

  • Who is my competition? When considering whether or not you want to apply for particular scholarship, take into account that you might be competing with. Are you only going to be competing with students at Echo Glen School? If so, financial need might be relative to the families represented at Echo Glen. If only five or six students apply for the scholarship, your financial need might be highest among this group. But if you are applying for a nationwide scholarship, your competition will be much greater. The obstacles that you have overcome, GPA, and community service participation are also relative to the group that applies, so keep that in mind as well.

     

  • Points to remember:

     

  • Presentation goes a LONG way! Make sure your application is representative of your best work. As with college applications follow directions carefully. Spelling, word usage, and grammar mistakes are a sure way to get people to put your paperwork at the bottom of the pile! Put your application in a clean manila envelope. Don’t fold your application. Address the envelope with your name; return address and the name of the scholarship, plus the address of the review committee.

     

  • Keep your resume to one page. Remember that scholarship review committees have many scholarship applications to read and a two or three-page document can in some reviewer’s eyes actually count against you.

     

  • Share a copy of your resume. Give a copy of your high school resume to your  to the people that you plan to have write your recommendation letters. This helps them write a letter that covers all the things you have accomplished.

     

  • Be yourself in your essay! Do not write what you think others want to read. Don’t be pretentious, or exaggerate to impress. Readers pick up on your lack of true voice and may get turned off. Instead, write about things that make you unique. Show rather than tell. By giving examples and illustrating your topic, you help bring it to life.

     

  • Don’t wait until the deadline. Don't wait to turn in your applications. Earlier is better!

     

  • Send a thank you note. It is always appropriate to write a thank you note to the organization awarding you a scholarship.

     

  • And last but not least. Have friends and family proofread your application, resume, and essay. Often times another set of eyes can pick up on mechanical errors that you have overlooked.

     

  • Scams
  • Searching for a Scholarship? Buyer Beware! This section is included to alert families to a concern that is increasingly widespread: fraudulent scholarship search services or in other words, SCHOLARSHIP SCAMS. Hundreds of scholar-ship services are on the market, but many are scams. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently launched Project Scholarship Scam to alert consumers about fraudulent search services The FTC warns students to beware if the scholarship service:
    • Guarantee that a student has won a scholarship
    • Pledges that this scholarship information is not available anywhere else.
    • Requests a credit card or bank account number so that they can hold the scholarship for the student. Requests payment before they can give the scholarship
    • Claims “a national foundation has selected you to receive a scholarship” or “you are a finalist” in a contest you never entered.
  • How else can you be aware of scams? Scholarship Scams usually have a particular set of characteristics. Watch out for these warning signs:
    • Application fees
    • Other fees
    • Guaranteed winnings
    • Everybody is eligible
    • Unsolicited opportunities
    • Typing & spelling errors
    • No telephone number
    • Mail drop for a return address
    • Operating out of a residence
    • Masquerading as a federal agency
    • Time pressure
    • Unusual requests for personal information
    • Notification by phone
    • High success rates
    • Excessive hype
    • Disguised advertising
    • A newly formed company
  • Scholarship Secrets - Scholarship Junkies